Amazon Steals 14% Tablet Market Share In Q4, Apple Share Drops To 57%

February 26, 2012 Leave a comment

It was clear since the Fire first debuted that it would launch some competitive product for Apple’s iPad, which has been dominated the market since it arrived. But today iSuppli has provided up a small insight into just how fierce the competition really is.

The research firm, Apple’s market share in the tablet arena went down form 64 percent in Q3 to 57 percent in Q4, with Amazon nabbing a 14 percent share.

Though the price tag $200 on the Kindle Fire seems to be an enough temptation for tablet buyers, according to IHS research Apple customers were more diverted away from the iPad by the iPhone 4S that they were the Fire.

It would seem as though that $200 price tag on the Kindle Fire was temptation enough for tablet buyers, but according to IHS research Apple customers were more swayed away from the iPad by the iPhone 4S than they were the Fire.

Including Christmas sales, Apple shipped at least 15.4 million iPads while Amazon had shipped 3.9 million Fires. It’s important to note that shipments are a very different number than sales, but with both of these products selling well we wouldn’t consider these numbers misleading by any means.

iSuppli projects that the iPad 3, which will most certainly be the superior device, will help Apple recapture any market share it lost over the past few months, but with such a gap between price points, anything can happen.

Meanwhile, Samsung’s Galaxy Tabs and Barnes & Noble’s Nook Tablet took the third and fourth spots, with 8 percent and 7 percent shares respectively.

Source: techcrunch

Battle of the Big Android Phones: LG Announces 5-inch Optimus Vu

February 24, 2012 Leave a comment

LG is hoping to get its newly announced Optimus Vu smartphone into the market which was previously owned by Samsung Galaxy Note- the world of the ultra-sized devices, that is.

Not content to wait for this year’s Mobile World Congress to unveil its big ol’ smartphone, LG has released some pictures and confirmed the specs of the second Korean-made Android smartphone to push the five-inches-or-bigger size classification.

But here’s the stinker for U.S. enthusiasts: The LTE smartphone’s scheduled to debut in Korea in March, and there’s been no announcement for when it might go international. In contrast, Samsung’s Galaxy Note officially launched today on AT&T in the U.S.

LG seems to have shunned the concept of “curves” on its rectangular device, which exposes a five-inch IPS LCD display (itself, running at a resolution of 1024-by-768 at a 4:3 aspect ratio). A 1.5-GHz Snapdragon CPU fills the Optimus Vu full of dual-core processing power and the device’s 32-gigabytes of built-in storage delivers plenty of room for pictures, videos, and apps – double the internal storage space of Samsung’s Galaxy Note, we note. There’s no indication as to whether the Optimus Vu will sport an SD card slot or not.

The Optimus Vu will possess the traditional dual-camera setup as seen in most of today’s smartphones:  LG Optimus Vu, in reply, also boasts a primary 8 MP, 3264×2448 pixels, autofocus, LED flash rear camera with Geo-tagging, face detection, image stabilization and video capabilities of 1080p at 30fps with additional LED video light (likely to support 1080p video recording) and a 1.3-megapixel front-facing camera. The Optimus Vu will launch with Android 2.3 (Gingerbread), but LG allegedly promises that the phone should bump up to the full Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich within months of the device’s release.

Samsung Galaxy Note is powered by a dual-core Mali-400MP Exynos 1.4 GHz ARM Cortex-A9 processor with 1 GB of RAM for a faster output and smart response.

Optimus Vu, however, is powered by a Qualcomm MSM8660 Snapdragon dual-core 1.5 GHz Scorpion Adreno 220 processor with 1 GB of RAM that makes it compete head-to-head with Note.

Optimus Vu weighs around 168 g (comparatively 10gs less than Samsung Galaxy Note) and has dimensions of 139.6 x 90.4 x 8.5 mm.

And we hope you’ve been holding your breaths for this one: The almighty stylus is back! According to LG, the Optimus Vu will ship with the company’s “Rubberdium pen” – let us prefer the word “stylus” for now – which will allow users to perform the usual bevy of tasks, like writing notes or making little drawings, on the Optimus Vu’s stylus-supporting applications.

This 8.5-milimeter thick smartphone will come with a 2,080 mAh battery, which is approximately 80 percent or so the total capacity of the battery found on the Samsung Galaxy Note. LG didn’t let slip the Optimus Vu’s talk time or standby time, so the jury remains out on just how well the device fares against the Galaxy Note on that one.

Source: pcmag

Latest iPad 3 Rumor Tips ‘A5X’ Chipset

February 23, 2012 Leave a comment

The rumors about iPad are in full vigor, and the latest news is on a chipset known as the A5X.

As reported by MacRumors, the forum for Chinese website WeiPhone includes a post with a image of the next-gen iPad’s logic board. The system-on-a-chip is labeled “A5X” and seems to have been produced in November 2011.

Apple watchers were under the thought that the chip in the company’s next iPad would be named the A6, because the first iPad had the name A4 and iPad 2 had the A5.

Earlier this year, 9to5Mac reported that the iPad 3 would  consist of a quad-core ship since Apple’s iOS 5.1 beta code included references to core management capabilities for quad-core processors.

It will be confusing when we think whose points are right. In such cases, it is best to take leaked photos and other Apple rumors not by word for word until Cupertino actually launches its products.  Apple is rumored to be holding its press event for the next iPad during the first week in March in San Francisco, so stay tuned.

We’ve certainly not been at a loss for iPad rumors lately – from retina displays and better cameras to a smaller, 8-inch model and 4G LTE capabilities. What do you hope to see? Let us know in the comments. Until then, see what PCMag’s Editor-in-Chief Dan Costa does not want in the iPad 3.

Source: pcmag

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Samsung Galaxy Note Lightning Review: Wait, Who Ordered This?

February 23, 2012 Leave a comment

Great technologies are often met with the response “I never knew I wanted that!” So, uhm, here’s the Samsung Galaxy Note! It will only fit in raverpants, and its trademark feature is a stylus. One may wonder for its features whether they are magnanimous smartphones or tiny tablet?

Well, it looks like every other tablet, obviously a rectangle of glass. This is their cup of tea who have the love for scribbling with stylus and for media eaters. This is thin and that there is a stylus jammed into it. It feels a bit plasticky though – too bad that it is becoming Samsung’s specimen.

The UI trails, still the pen is a real kind of fun, it can also be said as a unique factor of using an outdated technology on a modern product. But the best of Samsung Galaxy Note is that its large, beautiful super AMOLED HD screen.

The Achilles’ Heels of Samsung Galaxy Note is that when the user tries to justify putting a pen in the phone, they need to nail a biddy. The stylus misses way too many touches. Stylus doesn’t work on capacitive home keys.

-Though the TouchWiz UI lags a bit, the Note performs pretty well once your app is launched.
-Despite the very large battery, I still had to charge up in the middle of the day—the gigantic screen and the LTE radio bled the phone dry.
-You want to have your finger on the S-Pen’s button so you can grab a screencap or to bring up S Memo, but if you accidentally press the button (and you will—it has a bit of a hair trigger) the stylus stops writing.
-The S-Pen’s is so short and thin that it’s actually hard to hold. It’s like trying to write with a bamboo skewer.
-Not being able to use the pen on the the capacitive buttons is extremely annoying.
-Camera takes excellent photos and video (as you can see in the gallery). Certainly on par with the Galaxy S II. BUT, the shutter is insanely slow. Like often more than a second between when you hit the button and when it takes the shot (even after focus was set).
-The pen is supposed to differentiate between hundreds of levels of pressure. I’d say there’s more like… 8. When you’re pressing very lightly it doesn’t sense the touch at all.
-Handwriting recognition was terrible.

The physical features of Samsung Galaxy Note are as follows:

Samsung Galaxy Note
• Network: AT&T
• OS: Android 2.3 Gingerbread
• CPU: 1.5-GHz Dual-core Snapdragon processor
• Screen: 5.3-inch 800 x 1280 pixel LCD
• RAM: 1GB
• Storage: 32GB + up to 32GB microSD
• Price: $300 w/ 2-year contract, $650 w/o

 

Source: gizmodo

Four Must-Have Android Settings, From a Security Expert

February 23, 2012 Leave a comment

Google made an announcement last week that it has located a latest security flaw in Google Wallet,  through which a determined could root one’s non-rooted device ex post facto and retrieve your Google Wallet prepaid card. That was partly true. So we can assure that there is technical issue that remains still, even though if Google Wallet itself is safer.

To recap the Google Wallet brouhaha this month, first researcher Joshua Rubin from zvelo revealed a quick, simple brute force technique to extract the Google Wallet PIN from a rooted phone. But it actually requires some skills, but the next day The Smartphone Champ revealed that even in a non-rooted Nexus smartphone with Google Wallet, a thief can steal your Google Wallet prepaid card by simply wiping Google Wallet settings and attaching the app to a new Google account. Atlast, Rubin made a report on how a thief can root one’s non-rooted phone ex post facto and steal their Google Wallet funds. This is processed due to the root privileges that does not remove all the data on one’s Android device, and Google prepaid cards are stored in the device, not in one’s Google Wallet account.

Google made a respond to Rubin’s discovery. It suspended new prepaid cards on Sunday. The corporation began re-issuing Google Wallet prepaid cards on Tuesday, claiming that it has fixed the problem. But as a spokesman told Neil Rubenking, Google’s “fix” was to require users to contact Google Support to re-activate a Google Wallet account. So yes, the technical issue still remains.

Rubin, who discovered the latest hack and told us how one might get past the lock screen to perform the root exploit, offered four easy ways to tighten the security settings on your Android device. Not only do we urge anyone using Google Wallet to do this, but any Android user concerned about securing the data on his device should make sure the following Settings are turned on:

1. Enable Lock Screens: Under Settings\Security. Enable Face Unlock, Pattern, PIN, and Password to increase physical security to the device. Slide doesn’t do much.

2. Disable USB Debugging: Under Settings\USB debugging. When enabled, the data on mobile devices can be accessed without first passing a lock screen challenge unless Full Disk Encryption is also enabled.

3. Enable Full Disk Encryption: Under Settings\Security. This will prevent even USB Debugging from bypassing the lock screen.

4. Maintain Device Up-To-Date: Ensure the device is current with the latest official software. Unfortunately, users are largely at the behest of their carrier and cell phone manufacturer for this, but when you are finally prompted to upgrade your operating system, do so. Using only official software and keeping devices up-to-date is the best way to minimize vulnerabilities and increase security overall.

Bonus: Stick to official app stores. This is far less likely, but an attacker can also discover your PIN lock (which is necessary for him to root your phone) if you accidentally install a malicious app that records your personal data, including PIN. Most malicious apps are distributed through shady Chinese/Russian app stores; to be on the safe side stick to the Android Market, GetJar, and the Amazon App Store.

And always read through app permissions, as malicious apps typically make unusual requests. Most mobile security apps, like McAfee Mobile, Lookout Mobile, and F-Secure Mobile Security, come with an app auditing feature to help you keep tabs on permission requests.

Samsung Galaxy Note launches on AT&T February 19th

February 5, 2012 Leave a comment

It is a happy news for those who covet when AT&T announced that Samsung’s gigantic Galaxy Note smartphone would make its way to America, your wait is nearly over. The wireless carrier announced on January 30, that the firm would unveil the device on Sunday, February 19th. The mobile will cost $299.99 with a two-year contract of extension. For the customers who are much more eager to buy the phone, they can pre-order the Galaxy Note. The pre-order starts today and get it delivered two days early. The Galaxy Note LTE will be in Carbon Blue and Ceramic White color choices.

The Galaxy Note has created quite a following since the original model was announced way back in October, at the IFA show in Berlin.The most spectacular feature of the mobile is its 5.3 inch 1280×800 Super AMOLED display, easily the largest and the most high-resolution screen than any other mobile being sold today. It is a credit that it packs a Wacom digitzer and old-school stylus (“S-Pen”) for pen based drawing and input. The mobile has several applications to take the advantage of the stylus, as well as the S-Pen SDK for developers who want their apps to integrate with the feature as well. The future of the S-Pen to make its way to other devices depends upon the whether the Galaxy Note is well-received.

The Galaxy Note uses a dual-core 1.4Ghz processor, 1GB of RAM, 16GB of storage space and an 8MP camera. These all features is powered by an admirably large 2500 Ah battery. The Note runs Samsung’s TouchWiz version of Android 2.3 Gingerbread, but an update to Ice Cream Sandwich is already in the works. The major difference between AT&T’s version of the Note and those already released overseas is the new radio, which will take advantage of the carrier’s LTE data network. Rumors of other US Galaxy Note variants, particularly the “Galaxy Journal” on Verizon, have yet to be confirmed.

Source: androidcommunity

LG Intros Its First LTE Tablet, the Optimus Pad LTE

January 20, 2012 Leave a comment

LG has introduced its first Android-powered LTE tablet.

Longing for a tablet that can access to a next-gen wirelss 4G LTE network? LG has the one. The company has made its launch initially in Korea first sporting the same True HD IPS display tech used on the Optimus LTE smartphone.

It is called Optimus Pad LTE, the Honeycomb-flavored tablet. The tablet will feature an 8.9-inch IPS True HD Display with a 1280 x 768 resolution, an 8MP camera on the rear and a 2MP camera on the front. This tablet is processed by a 1.5 GHz Qualcomm dual-core, dual-channel SoC, and a 6,800mAh battery.

The device weighs around 1.1 lbs and measure 9.65 x 5.56 x 0.37-inches. It also possess 32 GB of on-board storage, a microSD card slot for adding up to an additional 32 GB, HDMI output, support for DLNA media streaming, and Google’s Android3.2. The tablet will also have the obvious LTE connectivity and presumably 802.11 b/g/n support for accessing Wi-F networks.

The company said on Wednesday,

Optimus Pad LTE offers easy-to-use controls and functions such as the Smart Movie Editor for editing pictures and videos more easily. Moreover, Web Duet allows for e-mailing, messaging and SNS sharing with search functions, and On-Screen Phone (OSP) ensures compatibility with LG smartphones.

LG has not tagged the price yet and also has not mentioned about its availability.

Source: tomsguide